How A Former Recruiter From Corporate-America Found A New Career Opportunity After A Burnout

Updated: Jan 20

"You can't build your repuation on what you're going to do" - Confucius

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People don't care about what you do for a living, they care about how you can contribute back to them. I made the mistake of caring more about the money I made instead of how I contributed to society. More so, I kept on telling people I met how much money I made rather than how much I mattered to those I served. I was not a servant leader; I was a young, naive corporate clone with a rod up his ass.

Don't Chase The Wrong Things

I graduated college back in the summer of 2017 from Tarleton State University. It's a decent regional university part of the Texas A & M system - a bridge people use to get into Texas A & M in College Station. I did not follow the crowd during my undergraduate education or even my graduate program. However, my mentality was to stick it to the assholes with a better education than me. My ambitions weren't in the right place throughout my college years. I only focused on the car I was going to drive, the money I would make, and the suits I would wear.


Chasing the wrong things ultimately tanked the start of my career. When I became a recruiter for a home health-care agency, I made bank. At fifty grand a year while living in the city of Fort Worth, I felt unstoppable. Unfortunately, after working 4 months there in the high-pressure and stress, I imploded. I cried to the COO about how I could no longer deal with the bullshit and immediately moved back into my mom's house. And just like that, my career path tanked.

Failure Will Happen Throughout Your Career

I focused my potential happiness on how much money I made and for what company I worked for. Regrettably, I worked over 60 hours a week and slept less than 4 hours on any given day. At the start of the job, I thought I was going to be happy but that proved otherwise in about 6 weeks. I became irritable, obese, frustrated, anxious, and depressed due to my inadequate performance.


Nearly every week I failed to accomplish my tasks, duties, and responsibilities. In light of this, it was much easier to study business than actually work in it. Taking an exam was easy when compared to being a recruiter. Failing a test wasn't as affecting when you were failing clients in real-time. I graduated with a 3.4 GPA under the impression I would never fail. That position proved me wrong considering the amount of accumulated failure. I eventually lost significance for myself and my capabilities.


Conclusion


Ironically, I would not change the outcome of my recruiter job. It helped excel my career path to get on the right track. After losing that job, I earned an opportunity to work for a non-profit mental health clinic. A clinic that removes the barrier to adequate mental healthcare for the community. Working there showed me to push myself to get